The Visible Archive

In this TEDxCanberrra talk, Mitchell Whitelaw talks about the limitations of the search box paradigm and presents a project he is involved in to preserve and visualize rich data about Australian cultural assets including photographs, prints and documents.

The Visible Archive (now discontinued) was a research project on the visualisation of archival datasets, supported by the National Archives of Australia under the 2008 Ian Maclean Award. As part of this work Whitelaw developed two prototype visualisations of the Archives collection:

  1. The Series Browser, visualising all 65,000 archival series in the collection

2. The A1 Explorer, showing some 64,000 records in series A1

Building on techniques developed in the Visible Archive project, the Flickr Commons Explorer was created. The Explorer (also discontinued) presents a three-pane interface consisting of a term cloud, a single image view, and a thumbnail grid, with a central strip providing navigation and orientation.

Flickr Commons Explorer’s main interface

Pauliceia 2.0: collaborative mapping of the history of São Paulo (1870-1940)

The Digital Humanities Laboratory (LHuD) of the School of Social Sciences (FGV CPDOC) is organizing an open lecture about the project “Pauliceia 2.0: collaborative mapping of the history of São Paulo (1870-1940)”, coordinated by professor Luis Ferla (Unifesp).

The project developed and made available a historical digital cartographic base of the city of São Paulo, referring to the period of its urban-industrial modernization (1870-1940). The lecture aims to discuss the online platform, disseminate its use and motivate the participation of scholars. The digital cartographic database is associated with an interface that allows interactivity and collaboration: researchers can both search for spatializable events on the map and feed the database with other geolocated events.

The lecture will take place at Acervo CPDOC (Rua Jornalista Orlando Dantas, 60, Botafogo, Rio de Janeiro) on May 29, 2019 (2:00 p.m.). Further information and registration can be found here.

The project was sponsored by Fapesp’s eScience program.