DH2017 – Computer Vision in DH workshop (Hands-on)

Hands-on Part I – Computer Vision basics, theory, and tools

SLIDES HERE

Instructor: Benoit Seguin (from Image and Visual Representation Lab – | École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)

An introduction of basic notions about the challenges of computer vision. A feeling of the simple, low-level operations necessary for the next stage.

Tools:
Python
Basic image operations: scikit-image
Face-object identification + identification: dlib
Deep Learning: Keras

What is CV?
How to gain high-level understanding from digital images or videos.
It tries to resolve tasks that humans can do (Wikipedia)

Human Vision System (HVS) versus Digital Image Processing (what the computer sees)

Our human understanding of images is way more complex than their digital version (arrays of pixels)
Convolution illustrated

Practice:
Jupyter system (an open-source web application that allows you to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations and explanatory text);
– perform basic image operations;
– Play with different convolutions to develop intuition.

Hands-on Part II – Deep Learning and its application

 

DH2017 – Computer Vision in DH workshop

During the DH2017 conference in Montreal, I attended the ‘Computer Vision in Digital Humanities‘ workshop organized by AVinDH SIG (Special Interest Group AudioVisual material in Digital Humanities). All information about the workshop can be found here.

An abstract about the workshop was published on DH2017 Proceedings and can be found here.

Computer Vision in Digital Humanities Workshop: Keynote by Lindsay King & Peter Leonard.
Workshop Computer Vision in Digital Humanities: hands-on session.

This workshop focus on how computer vision can be applied within the realm of Audiovisual Materials in Digital Humanities. The workshop included:

  • A keynote by Lindsay King & Peter Leonard (Yale University) on “Processing Pixels: Towards Visual Culture Computation”.
  • Paper presentations. (papers have been selected by a review commission)
  • hands-on session to experiment with open source Computer Vision tools.
  • Lightning Talks allowing participants to share their ideas, projects or ongoing work in a short presentation of two minutes.